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February 15, 2007

Renaissance 2054

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A Daniel Craig film you probably have not seen: Craig is the voice of Barthélémy Karas in Renaissance. This is the closest thing to Blade Runner since, uhh, Blade Runner.

Renaissance takes place in a futuristic Paris, where giant corporation Avalon has made a business out of the obsession for longevity. Ilona Tassueiv, their most brilliant researcher is kidnapped. Avalon’s CEO and the police want her found at any cost, so they get hostage retrieval specialist Officer Bartholomew Karas on the case. He soon realises he’s not the only one looking for her and that his rivals are prepared to go to any lengths to beat him to her.

There is something enormously appealing to me about an off kilter Paris of the future in French sf; with its debt to Los Angeles 2019 this Paris of 2054 is my favourite. But let's be clear about something: This is not Blade Runner. Maybe if Blade Runner was wearing beer goggles and made the beast with two backs with Immortel ad vitam its love child would look something like this. More important than the visuals - despite its visuals - this is a hard boiled crime story, not a film noir.

Posted by Ghost of a flea at February 15, 2007 07:27 AM

Comments

Ooh I want that...I love cyberpunk...so much that I have written a few cyberpunk novels myself.

Posted by: Andrew Ian Dodge [TypeKey Profile Page] at February 15, 2007 01:38 PM

I'm very curious about this movie, but it seems to have little plot, according to the critics.

Posted by: agent bedhead [TypeKey Profile Page] at February 15, 2007 02:45 PM

It is definitely longer on atmosphere than plot; though I expect the same could be said of most of the cinema of the 1940s.

Posted by: Ghost of a flea [TypeKey Profile Page] at February 15, 2007 02:58 PM

Minor peeve: why use a ten-dollar word like "oneiric" in the article when the rest of it was written in bland, indistiguishable prose? "Dreamlike" would have worked just as well, and wouldn't have looked so pretentious.

(Pretentiousness in the movie-writing genre has bugged me for years. One of my favorite irritations -- which has also long infected the world of rock music criticism -- is the use of the word "seminal" for "original." I am convinced it's so popular because it has the properties of being both pretentious and crude, so you can get your jollies off while sounding high-falutin.')

Posted by: Andrea Harris [TypeKey Profile Page] at February 15, 2007 05:35 PM